St Louis Historic Flooding


In the aftermath of recent flooding, the city of St. Louis has labored to protect vital infrastructure from the damages that the flooding has created. This includes wastewater treatment plants, highway bridges, embankments and more. St. Louis has collected necessary information on water flow data and level to be entered into the National Water Information System. This essential tool is specifically for monitoring heavy storms that can potentially cause damages, as well as to forecast floods and droughts in real time. Some communities in Missouri continue to battle rising floodwaters, while others are beginning their recovery efforts. As water levels begin to recede on some smaller rivers, residents are encouraged to use caution near flood water as contaminants can pose a health risk. It is estimated that nearly 200 homes have been impacted by the floods, with many more at risk of exposure to the flood-like conditions.

Interesting fact: did you know that residential waste stabilization lagoons are commonly used for onsite sewage treatment? The lagoons are used when the soils are unsuitable for the traditional gravity flow drain field systems.  A lagoon consists of an artificial pool for the treatment of sewage, or to accommodate surface water that overflows the storm drains during heavy rain. Interestingly, a septic tank is the most common onsite sewage treatment system for cities throughout Missouri. However, a connection to the city’s sewer system is the most reliable means of sewage disposal.

St. Louis, you’re invited!! Perma-Liner Industries requests your attendance at our Open House in Anaheim, CA. It’s taking place for three days from June 13th –June 15th and we want to see you there! It’ll be chock-full of live demonstrations and information on all of the CIPP technology available. Don’t miss this! Call us to confirm your reservation @ 1-866-336-2568

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St. Louis has sustained historic flooding from the Meramec River, a relatively small Mississippi tributary that bombarded communities in the far southwestern reaches of the St. Louis suburbs during the week. Two wastewater treatment plants were so damaged by the floodwaters that raw sewage spewed into the river. Hundreds of people were evacuated in the Missouri communities of Pacific, Eureka, Valley Park and Arnold, where many homes took in water. Two-dozen homes in Cape Girardeau also sustained damage from flooding conditions. Catastrophic damage has been a result in several nearby areas. Evacuations were required in the areas most threatened, as conditions were expected to persist, calling for a State of emergency.

In addition, road closures abounded. Traffic was rerouted to allow for sandbagging and pumping, including a 24 mile stretch of Interstate 44. The Mississippi River, which runs beside the Gateway Arch and downtown St. Louis, was also expected to reach nearly 13 feet above flood stage, which would be considered the second-worst flood on record, behind only the devastating 1993 flood.  Although a flood wall protects the city, firefighters and emergency road crews worked to pump out water from flooded storm drains behind a 7-foot-high, 1,000-foot-long temporary retaining wall reinforced by gravel and sandbags. Spring River, which was among the waterways to overflow, was also under advisement.

Currently, conditions call for a massive cleanup and the State of emergency has been lifted, interstates are also slowly returning to normal. The St. Louis region is now struggling with the most extensive flooding seen in more than 20 years.  Perma-liner Industries is here for you! Call us or go online so we can offer you our best products and services during the aftermath and cleanup period of this devastating flood. 1-866-336-2568/ www.perma-liner.com

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